incidentalcomics:

Creative Thinking

marucos:

PB

marucos:

PB

meatfart:

electricalice:

while this is mostly about facts, there are a lot of opinions in this tutorial (namely my distrust on several brands marketing strategies, and my opinion that’s better to start with cheap student quality stuff. LOTS of people disagree on that point) as well that you should take as what they are: personal opinions.

here is slightly more readable than on tumblr

this is the result of several years of research on creating a cheap but high quality palette that would help me.

other things to be aware of: pigments are generally more resistant in oil and acrylics than they are in watercolor. but there are a couple of pigments that work well in watercolor but really badly in oil.

resources
pigments through the ages
a comprehensive guide to watercolor pigments and a lot of tests on popular brands
about van gogh’s bedroom
Blue and Yellow don’t make green by Michael Wilcox

a side note, at least for acrylic in my experience, sometimes there are colors in acrylic lines like manganese? i think or say some kind of aqua…special fun kind of color. Get familiar with the pigment codes, and check these blended colors and just buy the base tubes. You can mix the fun color yourself and makes tons of variation. Some blues especially? are basically pthalo blue and pth. green and white in different ratios….so it would be a waste obvi to buy an aqua and prussian or manganese or brilliant blue with acrylic lines cause you can make all or those and more yourself. Really just buy blends if youre using that exact color for large fills or sth….some of these base colors have different shades you’d do well to be aware of too and select those based on what colors you intend to mix with.

OP mentions only buying the primaries in artist grade, but I’d recc getting the secondaries too…diox purple, some kind of pigment orange, pthalo green….it’s very difficult to mix these colors purely with primaries and they often become muddy. It’s best when you get picky to just buy the actual single pigment secondaries for vibrancy’s sake…

OH ACTUAL LEGIT SAFETY NOTE???

many pigments are actually HEAVY METALS or METAL OXIDES. Typically this will reflect in higher price, but Chromium Oxide green or Cadmium red or Cobalt blue and others are TOXIC. Don’t put them on your skin, wash after using them, and you really ought no eat while painting with them ahaha…It’s not like insta-cancer or illness if you’re in contact/using these materials, but don’t deliberately get this stuff on you!

splatterfilm:

kyouhei has puppy ears ^q^
blank

splatterfilm:

kyouhei has puppy ears ^q^

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america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

hakogaku:

hakogaku promoting ooedo onsen monogatari ☆

(Source: t.co)

2dron:

Fukukin & Todomaki

2dron:

Fukukin & Todomaki

kanapy:

yeah, yeah, red were burning red ♪

kanapy:

yeah, yeah, red were burning red ♪

mattyartcorner:

Stacy, some sort of Indian mermaid princess, a girl, and me at work and some shit me and a coworker were talking about….

reminder i have an art blog!!

socialjusticekoolaid:

Love “Da Man Wit the Chips” but Jameila White is the new “Protest MVP.” #staywoke #trill 

sun-thief-rai:

No words. She was also with Talib who was told by police to keep his hands up or they’ll blow his brains out. And some resident protestors are exhausted with everything and saying that street medics told them they’re experiencing a subcategory of PTSD.

So.

Yeah.

I’m weary.

jonesypop:

Kiki’s Delivery Service!

littletinyboy:

indie dad rock

(Source: eggtragedy)

anatomicalart:

briannacherrygarcia:

itscourtoon:

bathsabbath:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

Such baby bullshit. Don’t even get out of bed for these rates.

    If you are an artist who wants to make money off their art, I highly suggest you buy The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook. It goes in depth about copyright issues and even contains contract and model release templates. The 2013 book *I believe* states the average professional charges $72 an hour. This article calculated that to make a 40k annual salary you would need to charge about $60 per hour.

  After graduating from Art Center in 2012, I think I asked for somewhere between $35-45 an hour and got laughed at by multiple big name clients, which was infuriating, sadly expected, and terrifying with over $100K worth of student loans staring me in the face. If they tell you it will be “great exposure” that’s a red flag. Ask yourself how their exposure can compare to your Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook pages combined? 

And when you do get a decent paying gig, PROTECT YOURSELF. You have the right to negotiate and revise a contract. Do not start a job until you have a contract signed. If they don’t provide you with one, MAKE ONE. And make sure you have your bases covered. You can specify in a contract that maybe two revisions are included in your cost, and if they ask you to revise the piece more than twice, they will have to pay extra. In terms of payment schedule, I usually do the 50/50 Method (50% before, 50% after) or the 3/3/3 Method (1/3 before, 1/3 in the middle, 1/3 after all work has been received). Both of those are pretty standard in the industry, as they guarantee you will get compensated for your time, even if the job goes bad.

Remember you have a skill, and you have spent time honing that skill and you deserve to be adequately paid for that time and effort. You will have clients dismiss you because, honest to God they think, “Well, I could do that if I wanted. Hell, my five year old does it now.” No they can’t, because they didn’t, they don’t, they won’t and they probably never will. And good luck hiring a five year old. They can’t keep a fucking deadline.

And in a last ditch effort they’ll say, “But that drawing only took you an hour!” Son, that drawing took me 20. fucking. years.

10 Dollars for 1 minute of animation.  Oh my god my heart.  It took my team 6 months and a team of 12 to make a 4 minute short. 

The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook

I second this book! I’ve had it for several years now, and it’s been a HUGE help in my work as a freelance artist. It gives great advice on what to charge for different areas of art!

Please remember. Your art is worth a respectable payment! Accepting ridiculously low prices actually hurts the arts/illustration/animation communities because it makes employers believe they can employ people without offering decent pay.


Check the internet if you need help figuring out what you should be charging for your commissions. Invest in the books that will inform you professionally, and put your foot down if you think someone is trying to cheat you out of your time and hard work.
You have a right to refuse a job, and/or request decent payment. If your employer denies a you decent pay, well then they’re probably not a very good employer.
Do not undersell your skills. it is bad for the art community and you are worth more then that.

neptune-estate:

Details from Rick Owens FW09 "Crust"